Month: March 2013

More Cooking Firsts

When I purchased all the spices to cook Ethiopian food there was some ridiculous price minimum to avoid paying $12 in pure shipping fees, so I bought 2 lbs of green coffee beans. I really like Ethiopian coffee, but what do I know about roasting coffee beans. So like before, I turned to Efrem for advice. He used to have to make coffee in his house growing up, 2-3 times a day for his mom and whoever happened to be visiting. Although, he didn’t have a coffee bean grinder, so I’m sure that’s why he has such sarcastic memories of making coffee having to grind it with a makeshift mortar and pestle. But thankfully, my only chore was to roast the beans. They’ve been sitting there in bags staring at me for a couple weeks now, but today I finally took the time to take a chance on roasting them on the stove top. It wasn’t really difficult, but no one warned me they’d pop a bit. The beans look like they should, but I …

GF Chocolate Mug Cake

I often have cravings for sweet baked goods, and given that I’m not really adept at gluten free baking (I’d gotten pretty good at baking with regular flour), and most recipes call for 7 different flours that all cost mad money, I’ve resorted to looking up those little chocolate mug cakes to satisfy small cravings. I’ve looked up several different recipes for a gluten free version and tried 3 or 4, but none of them were really all that great. Today I just decided to wing and throw a bunch of stuff in a cup. It came out pretty good, probably the best balance of textures, a little dense. The only thing I would change is maybe a little less coconut flour, a little vanilla, and more chocolate. Recipe: 2 tbs coconut flour 1/4 tsp baking powder 1/2 tsp cocoa powder 1 egg 1/4 cup chocolate chips 1/4 cup water (or until its a decent consistency) 1 tsp oil I melted half the chocolate and mixed it with the egg. Mix all the dry ingredients …

The Ethiopian Culinary Adventures Continue

I continued my learning of Ethiopian cuisine by attempting to make my favorite: shiro. Again I was getting tenuous instructions from the boyfriend. But at the end of it all my dish turned out all right. Just needed some garlic and maybe another small tomato. Anyway, dessert was some more gluten free baked goods retrieved from peacebakers in metairie. It took forever to get there in strangely early traffic, but it was worth it. And I’ll remember how much it was worth it tomorrow when I destroy a biscuit for breakfast.

My First Stab at Cooking Ethiopian

Dating an Ethiopian man, whose friends are all Ethiopian (almost exclusively), means I’ve eaten a LOT of Ethiopian food. Mind you they don’t really cook it being that they’re all men and they have wonderful mothers who cooked for them all the time, and still do. So other than the chopping of raw meat and some tibs, we mostly went out to eat injera. Well being back in the states in a city that’s not DC, there’s only a couple of restaurants, and given that it’s really a commodity, they can afford to charge much more than I would pay to eat the same thing when I was in Cape Town. So I decided I was going to try my hand at cooking some dishes at home. My favorites are beyanetu and shero, but don’t get me wrong, I love my meat as well. I’ve been wanting to learn how to cook shero and asked my boyfriend to ask his mother how she makes hers, since she owns a restaurant back in SA. But, of …

“Nope, I can’t eat that.”–Lent for a Non-Catholic

Living in New Orleans is great for any number of reasons, but one of the biggest reasons is the FOOD. It’s just so good between the oysters, crawfish, beignets, cafe au lait, po boys, muffaletas, sno balls topped in condensed milk, shrimp and grits, all the fried variations, all the drinks, and the list just goes on and on. What it’s not great for is your waistline. Especially as a student where you sleep irregularly and stress eat/drink. It’s worse if you’re one of the majority of Americans, like myself, who doesn’t just have one of those miraculous metabolisms and can eat copious amounts of food all day and never change weight. I’ve gone up and down over the years–never anything too drastic–but enough to notice the way clothes change their fit (or don’t fit). When I moved down here I was in pretty great shape. I’d just moved from NYC where I was going to dance class 2-3 a week, did a stint with bikram yoga, and was “bodyrocking” every other day while cooking …